Understanding Lupus

Understanding Lupus
A health awareness and educational symposium for the community

 The mission of this presentation  is to heighten the awareness and education within the community about the mystery, symptoms and treatment of lupus. It will attempt to provide useful information on managing one of the most rapidly increasing health concerns in America today, especially within African American and Latino communities.  This interactive activity will attempt to provide a better understanding of lupus for patients, caregivers and the medical community.

Keynote speaker Dr. Elena M Massarotti, Co-Director, Center for Clinical Therapeutics, Rheumatology, Director, Clinical Trials, Lupus Center, Division of Rheumatology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA .
10 a.m. to – 2 p.m.
Saturday, September 6, 2014
The Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library
2401 Welton Street
Denver CO 80205
Links Room, 1st Floor
720.865.2116

Presented by:UL LOGO circle
The Denver Urban League Guild of Metropolitan Denver in partnership with Lupus Colorado.
Sponsored by: Med Learning Group

Light refreshments will be served*
Seating will be limited*



Bring Back the Fanny Pack and Other Lessons from Getting Lost in the Woods

Carie ShermanBy Carie Sherman

The BFF and I recently took a hike. We got lost. Well, not really lost, per se. Let’s just call it misinformed about the direction we had taken. We didn’t have a trail map. We “kinda” remembered the name of the trail we planned to take. And we “kinda” turned a 3-mile hike into 8.

Relax. We were in Castlewood Canyon State Park. We were able to see a physical human establishment for at least half of the hike and never spent more than 30 minutes between other groups of hikers–most of whom were refreshed and beginning their hikes from the various parking lots our trail took us past. And we had plenty of water.

The park does have decent elevation gains. My guess is at least 40,000 feet.

Here’s the best part: I wore a fanny pack. It was awesome. The BFF protested but knew if she took a real stand against my fanny pack I might start reconsidering the helmet I threatened to wear because of an article I’d just read about head injuries. She’s a confident girl and can handle when I’m strange, but she does try to stop me from humiliating myself.

Anyway, chronic pain folks, take note: I always carried a backpack but it kills my back and shoulders, likely due to the terrible hiking posture that one gains when one constantly stares at one’s feet. Turns out, my hips are good for hauling. I wholeheartedly encourage you to come to the darkside. Let’s Bring Back the Fannypack!

Who am I kidding. Fanny packs probably are back, for all I know about fashion and the like.

Anyway. 8 miles. Me. If I had known it would be 8 miles, I never would have started. I haven’t gone that far since 2010. And I didn’t realize it at the time, probably because the sheer elation of not needing to call in a backcountry search party for a day hike just minutes from urban areas, but it was a big deal. I hiked 8 miles. In this body. This body that two weeks ago wouldn’t allow me to lift my arms. As you know, I have an entire blog dedicated to my body failing me.

And here’s a kicker: I could walk the next day. And the day after that. And even the days after that, which were leading up to my period, when typically all hell breaks lose and I move only when forced. My body was…good.

Now, I’m not saying that I’ve cured my mind, body, and soul here. But I learned a valuable life lesson on this hike, and it’s a lesson you can apply to just about any circumstance under the sun.

Sometimes you have to get lost. Sometimes you just have to work way harder than your brain believes you can–even if the only reason is because you were forced. If you have the desire–and someone awesome by your side–you can really surprise yourself.

I have a lot of goals right now. One in particular scares the crap out of me. I have no idea what I’m doing. But I know I have to work and work hard and rely on the crazy cool people in my life.

I might not bring back the fanny pack (assuming, of course, it’s not already back). I might whine and complain. But I’ll stay on the dang trail til the end. Because I can.


6 Tips for Pacing Yourself

Carie ShermanBy Carie Sherman

With the long holiday weekend approaching, I needed to take some time to consider my plans and how they might affect my health. So here are a few tips I’ve considered. And please, share yours in the comments below.

1) Join the right pack. Whether you’re with family, friends, or a combo of both, find someone whose energy level rivals yours. For me, this means attaching myself to my toddler (who still needs a nap) and my grandmother (who also needs a nap). Express your need to take it slow–you may be surprised by the people among you who would revel in the opportunity to sleep during the day.

2) Do what excites you and skip the rest. Take a look at the planned course (aka, your weekend events). What are the “must do’s?” What’s planned that you won’t be sad about skipping? Perhaps the family barbecue is a must, but you couldn’t care less about seeing fireworks. If you’re hosting, make a plan. For example, I don’t mind cooking, but shopping wears me out. (Of course so does cleaning up…which I also make known…seriously not such a bad thing!)

3) Fuel up and hydrate. When your energy levels are limited, skimping on food and water can be a disaster. I’m learning to eat more frequently and drink far more water than I think I need. It’s helped me to find some “go to” snacks that stay fresh and don’t melt (I like KIND bars). Also, find an easy-to-carry a water bottle. I like a cup with a lid and straw; my BFF swears by her Camelbak bottle while my hubby is a Nalgene fan. Bonus: Check out the Pillid bottle from Nalgene–Pill-Lid (get it?). It’s kinda perfect.

4) Practice safe sun. Even if you’re not sun-sensitive, the sun can drain. Scope out shaded areas and pack an umbrella. And don’t forget your hat. Of course, you already know sunscreen is a must. I forget to apply it, so I start each day with a body lotion with SPF 50. I also just found a lip gloss with SPF.

5) Rest before you’re beat. Check in with your body as the day progresses. Is it signalling that it’s time for a break? My hands tend to burn and tingle when I get close to my edge. I also notice that my body stops regulating temperature well (If I’m asking my husband “is it hot in here?” or “are you cold?”, it’s time for a rest). Short breaks can keep you in the fun for the long haul.

6) Prepare mentally and stop comparing. If I go in to an activity with a positive mindset, I’m less likely to feel bad if I can’t keep up. But if I begin said activity feeling sorry for myself, it’s a downward spiral to Pity City. So I say to myself, “Today I will do what I can do” and leave it at that. It’s a conscious decision to stay mindful of myself, my body, and what I CAN do.

How do you pace yourself? Share your tips in the comments–we’d all love to hear them.

On behalf of everyone here at Lupus Colorado, cheers to a fun–and healthy–July 4th weekend!